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New owner:Worried about HPFP failures

clementwcm2010-11-19 00:08:16 +0000 #1
Hi everyone!

It's great to find a relatively active forum for Aussie bimmer owners. I just purchased 3 days a go one of the last N54 335i coupes from a Sydney dealership after striking a reasonable deal (runout deal). I was struggling between waiting for the new N55 coupes and or getting the current model 2010 N54 coupe at a good discount. Finally bit the bullet on the N54 machine and now starting to regret as I'm reading more and more in various forums about the HPFP failures especially in the US. It almost sounds like every 2nd car is getting the problem in the US, some even have the pump replaced 3-5 times! I'm petrified about getting stranded in the middle of no where with the pump failure while doing a long country drive. I wonder if this problem also exist in Australian N54 engines. Attempted searching for post from Aussies and a have found only a couple of reports of HPFPs. I really wasn't expected such poor reliability for a car that is costing upwards of $120k loaded in Australia!

I guess I would want to know how common this problem in fact is. Is it something that is likely to happen in the next couple of years of ownership (I intend to keep this car for the next 5-6 years). Anyone else had their HP failed and how many times? I really hope that with the higher quality fuel that we use here in Australia compared to the US, the fuel pumps are longer lasting over here. It is very worrying that it can happen anytime you drive.. therefore I can't even be driving long distances in the country??

BTW. Any consensus with the N54 vs N55 debate?

Nice getting to know you all!


TrackRat2010-11-19 00:14:39 +0000 #2
Well you'll get lots of opinions, but here's what I've gleened on the subject:

1. Yes the N54 HPFP failures exist worldwide including in Australia, Asia, Europe, the US, etc.

2. The fuel does not seem to be the issue because the HPFPs fail in Europe, Australia and elsewhere where they do not use ethanol in the fuel and the fuel is considered good quality

3. BMW has not released any official statistics on the HPFP failures but back in early 2008 when NHTSA.gov began their investigation into 2007 model x35i HPFP failures, BMW told NHTSA that they "estimated that less than 5% of BMW owners would experience a HPFP failure".

We don't know if that is 5% of all BMW owners in history or what????? Based on some surveys the failure rate is above 34% and the re-failure rate above 20+%.

www.surveymethods.co...C18A8C878CC5D5D380C3

There are several class action lawsuits in the U.S. against BMW for the N54 HPFP failures and other engine issues, so more info. may eventually be available to the public.

4. BMW is on their 4th HPFP part number I believe with the 943 pump that is installed on models produced in Germany as of 12/09.

No one knows if the 943 HPFP is better, worse or has the same failure rate as prior HPFP part numbers. Two people on these forums report they believe their failed HPFP was in deed a 943 part number but this has not been independently confirmed.

5. There is nothing you can do to prevent the HPFP failure from happening. There is no guarantee that your vehicle will have multiple HPFP failures like many BMW owners have experienced. I doubt the failure rate is 1 in 2 but I believe it is far above 5% unless we are talking 5% of all BMW owners in history...

6. No one knows if the N55 is any better, worse or has the same problems as the N54. It's amazing that after four model years BMW has yet to properly resolve the N54 engine issues.

Don't stress over the matter. Prepare accordingly for a HPFP failure or other common N54 engine issue like injectors, ignition coils, sparkplugs or frequent software upgrades. If this is unacceptable as it is to many BMW owners and potential BMW owners, I'd trade the car for something more reliable. Some people have a real high tolerance for pain and will stick with the x35i regardless of the headaches and lack of reliability. It's just not worth the aggravation to most people even though the 335i is a fun car when it's running properly.
vgr022010-11-19 00:29:43 +0000 #3
First of all -: congratulations on your new car and welcome to the forum.

I think TrackRat summed it up really well. It's a known issue and I'm sure BMW are working hard in the background to resolve the N54 HPFF issues. Who knows, maybe the N55 setup is the solution. What I know is you shouldn't make an issue over something that might or might not happen to your car. Just enjoy your ownership of your new car.

One thing I would never take forgranted is a corolation between how much you spend on a car has a bearing on it's reliability. In fact, my arguement would be that the more you spend equates to more problems as you have more gadgets with the potential to fail. If it goes wrong then be comforted by the fact that BMW is one of the best brands to own as they handle warrenty claims quickly and fairly.

Just drive and enjoy !!!
xsboost2010-11-19 01:28:11 +0000 #4
Not many people here in Oz had the problem with the HPFP, supposedly because our fuel is better.

Mine's still going strong and I am tuned
John_012010-11-19 00:21:41 +0000 #5
Congrats! the 2009 335i coupe is a very nice car.

It has very elegant styling that I think will stand the test of time very well.

Personally I think that two conventional turbos is a good setup from a performance point of view, although I am sure the N55 will also be very nice in factory tune.

Fuel pump issues seem to be more common in the US than Australia, but then there are a lot more BMW owners to make noise about it over there.
docbeemer2010-11-19 00:36:19 +0000 #6
Quote:

Originally Posted by xsboost

Not many people here in Oz had the problem with the HPFP, supposedly because our fuel is better.

Mine's still going strong and I am tuned

Maybe not many people reported it on this forum. I've had 2 HPFP's replaced on my car, along with the battery and a set of injectors. BTW I don't think that our fuel is better than europe.

If you haven't had a problem then you're just lucky...
docbeemer2010-11-19 02:38:47 +0000 #7
oh, and welcome to the forum clement. It's very informative and generally very friendly. A much better source of info on BMW than the stealership!
clementwcm2010-11-19 03:14:36 +0000 #8
Thx DocBeemer... not good to hear that Aussie owners are also suffering alot from HPFP failures. I guess I should've researched a bit more before biting the bullet (too late now).

By the way what symptoms did ur 335i showed when the HPFP starting failing? I'm most worried about being stranded in the bush in the middle of no where without mobile reception. Do you even dare going for long drives?
Jeef Beef2010-11-19 02:03:31 +0000 #9
Quote:

Originally Posted by clementwcm

Thx DocBeemer... not good to hear that Aussie owners are also suffering alot from HPFP failures. I guess I should've researched a bit more before biting the bullet (too late now).

By the way what symptoms did ur 335i showed when the HPFP starting failing? I'm most worried about being stranded in the bush in the middle of no where without mobile reception. Do you even dare going for long drives?

Hey mate, welcome to the forum. Despite the woes plaguing x35i cars, you won't regret the purchase

Find a nice set of twisties, and everything will be forgotten.

You'll find a lot of help around here, or at least a place to share the pain when everything isn't going as expected.

The most typical symptoms for HPFP failure are continuous long cranks (engine takes 4-5 seconds to start up from cold) and check engine lights while you are driving. Power loss is to be expected as well. Sometimes the symptoms may persist for months before the pump actually dies, or sometimes the pump might just clonk out right there.
clementwcm2010-11-19 02:25:24 +0000 #10
I just read from another forum that delaying pressing the start button for 2-3 seconds after the keys are in (my car doesn't have comfort access) could avoid long cranks and maybe HPFP in the long run?
TrackRat2010-11-19 03:34:06 +0000 #11
Quote:

Originally Posted by clementwcm

I just read from another forum that delaying pressing the start button for 2-3 seconds after the keys are in (my car doesn't have comfort access) could avoid long cranks and maybe HPFP in the long run?

That just allows the electric pump to build pressure longer, same as the new software does. It's a bandaid for a failing HPFP.
JC32010-11-19 02:29:40 +0000 #12
I've got a 2008 335i (coming up to two years) and have had no problems with the HPFP or anything else for that matter.

This is my third BMW (E46 318i, E60 530i and now the E90 335i) in 12 years and have never had any problems with the engines or had anything go dramatically wrong mechanically. Perhaps one day my run of luck with Bimmers will come to an end.
FYI2011-07-08 21:35:15 +0000 #13
Huge HPFP inventory. The End of the N54/N55 HPFP Fuel Pump Saga?

-----------------------------------------------
BMW HPFP Part Numbers
1. 13-51-7-537-320 HPFP
2. 13-51-7-585-655 HPFP
3. 13-51-7-592-881 HPFP
4. 13-51-7-596-123 HPFP
5. 13-51-7-594-943 HPFP

6. 13-51-7-613-933 HPFP

7. xx-xx-x-xxx-402 HPFP

8. 13-51-7-616-170 HPFP
9. 13-51-7-616-446 HPFP

-----------------------------------------------

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